Apr 22 2022

Hackers Are Getting Caught Exploiting New Bugs

Category: Hacking,Information SecurityDISC @ 9:12 am

Tags: hackers


May 28 2014

8 Best Books That Every Budding #Hacker Must Read

Category: Hacking,Pen TestDISC @ 11:41 am

hacking1

Everyone knows that a hacker by extension is always a programmer. What many don’t know though is that there is a lot more to it. It’s not just about knowing the language. A hacking is mainly defined by his curiosity to know what is otherwise not to be known.

While the following books are on a subject of hacking, they cover a lot of in-depth knowledge on the subject which includes but not limited to examples and exercises. As an ethical hacker, it’s something you can never pass up and may need to know.

 

1. Hacking: The Art of Exploitation, 2nd Edition

Hacking is the art of creative problem solving, whether that means finding an unconventional solution to a difficult problem or exploiting holes in sloppy programming. Many people call themselves hackers, but few have the strong technical foundation needed to really push the envelope.

Rather than merely showing how to run existing exploits, author Jon Erickson explains how arcane hacking techniques actually work. To share the art and science of hacking in a way that is accessible to everyone, Hacking: The Art of Exploitation, 2nd Edition introduces the fundamentals of C programming from a hacker’s perspective.

The included LiveCD provides a complete Linux programming and debugging environment-all without modifying your current operating system. Use it to follow along with the book’s examples as you fill gaps in your knowledge and explore hacking techniques on your own. Get your hands dirty debugging code, overflowing buffers, hijacking network communications, bypassing protections, exploiting cryptographic weaknesses, and perhaps even inventing new exploits.

 

2. The Basics of Hacking and Penetration Testing: Ethical Hacking and Penetration Testing Made Easy

The Basics of Hacking and Penetration Testing serves as an introduction to the steps required to complete a penetration test or perform an ethical hack. You learn how to properly utilize and interpret the results of modern day hacking tools; which are required to complete a penetration test. Tool coverage will include, Backtrack Linux, Google, Whois, Nmap, Nessus, Metasploit, Netcat, Netbus, and more. A simple and clean explanation of how to utilize these tools will allow you to gain a solid understanding of each of the four phases and prepare them to take on more in-depth texts and topics. This book includes the use of a single example (pen test target) all the way through the book which allows you to clearly see how the tools and phases relate.

 

3. Metasploit: The Penetration Tester’s Guide

The author of this book David Kennedy is Chief Information Security Officer at Diebold Incorporated and creator of the Social-Engineer Toolkit (SET), Fast-Track, and other open source tools. Some see this book as a right of passage for anyone to be a hacker.

 

4. BackTrack 5 Wireless Penetration Testing Beginner’s Guide

Written in Packt’s Beginner’s Guide format, you can easily grasp the concepts and understand the techniques to perform wireless attacks in your lab. Every new attack is described in the form of a lab exercise with rich illustrations of all the steps associated. You will practically implement various attacks as you go along. If you are an IT security professional or a security consultant who wants to get started with wireless testing with Backtrack, or just plain inquisitive about wireless security and hacking, then this book is for you. The book assumes that you have familiarity with Backtrack and basic wireless concepts.

 

5. CEH Certified Ethical Hacker All-in-One Exam Guide

Get complete coverage of all the objectives included on the EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker exam inside this comprehensive resource. Written by an IT security expert, this authoritative guide covers the vendor-neutral CEH exam in full detail. You’ll find learning objectives at the beginning of each chapter, exam tips, practice exam questions, and in-depth explanations. Designed to help you pass the exam with ease, this definitive volume also serves as an essential on-the-job reference.

 

6. Ghost in the Wire

Get complete coverage of all the objectives included on the EC-Council’s Certified Ethical Hacker exam inside . Kevin Mitnick was the most elusive computer break-in artist in history. He accessed computers and networks at the world’s biggest companies–and however fast the authorities were, Mitnick was faster, sprinting through phone switches, computer systems, and cellular networks. He spent years skipping through cyberspace, always three steps ahead and labeled unstoppable. But for Kevin, hacking wasn’t just about technological feats-it was an old fashioned confidence game that required guile and deception to trick the unwitting out of valuable information

 

7. America the Vulnerable

A former top-level National Security Agency insider goes behind the headlines to explore America’s next great battleground: digital security. An urgent wake-up call that identifies our foes; unveils their methods; and charts the dire consequences for government, business, and individuals.

 

8. CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-301 Study Guide

CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-301 Study Guide is an update to the top-selling SY0-201 guide, which helped thousands of readers pass the exam the first time they took it. The SY0-301 version covers every aspect of the SY0-301 exam, and includes the same elements readers raved about in the previous version.

Each of the eleven chapters presents topics in an easy to understand manner and includes real-world examples of security principles in action. The author uses many of the same analogies and explanations he’s honed in the classroom that have helped hundreds of students master the Security+ content. You’ll understand the important and relevant security topics for the Security+ exam, without being overloaded with unnecessary details. Additionally, each chapter includes a comprehensive review section to help you focus on what’s important.

Over 450 realistic practice test questions with in-depth explanations will help you test your comprehension and readiness for the exam. The book includes a 100 question pre-test, a 100 question post-test, and practice test questions at the end of every chapter. Each practice test question includes a detailed explanation to help you understand the content and the reasoning behind the question. You’ll be ready to take and pass the exam the first time you take it.

 




Tags: BackTrack, hackers, Hacking, Linux, Metasploit Project, Netbus, Netcat, Nmap, Penetration test, White hat (computer security)


Jul 22 2013

Your employees aren’t the only threat to InfoSec and Compliance

Category: cyber security,Information SecurityDISC @ 1:18 pm

Information security

Information security (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

July 22nd, 2013 by Lewis Morgan 

I overheard a conversation the other day, one which left me so stunned that I’ve decided to write about it….

Two men having dinner behind me (I got the impression they were both directors) were discussing the £200k fine the NHS received for losing patient data. Eventually, the conversation turned into a discussion about information security as a whole. I won’t go into all the details but one of them said, “We don’t particularly focus on cyber security, it’s always large organisations which are in the news about getting hacked and being a small company, we’re not under threat”. It bothered me (probably more than it should have) that someone in control of an organisation has that attitude to cyber security. If an organisation of 5 employees was hacked, the same day as, let’s say DELL, were hacked – who’d make it into the news? DELL would, why? Because it’s likely to be more of an interest to the readers/listeners and will have a bigger impact on the public compared to that of the smaller organisation.

I never see stories in the news of someone being hit by a bus in my local town, but it doesn’t mean I’ll walk in front of one holding a sign saying ‘hit me’. That’s effectively what this director is doing, turning a blind eye to a large threat just because he’s not seen an example of a small organisation being hacked – chances are he doesn’t even read the publications which cover those stories.

Ignorance

It’s a strong word, isn’t it? Personally I hate calling people ignorant, I’d rather use a more constructive word such as ‘unaware’, but I feel that using the word ignorance will raise some eyebrows.

As a director of a company, your aim is to maximise revenue, minimise costs and anything in between.

You need a future for your organisation; this is usually done by investing in your marketing efforts, improving your products/services and providing the best customer service possible. But what do you do to actually secure a future? It’s all good and well having a 5 year plan which see’s 400% growth in revenue, but how do you make sure that your organisation will even exist in 5 years?

2 years into your plan and you’re hitting your targets – but you’ve just discovered that there’s been a data breach and your customers credit card details have been sold online.

Your plans have now become redundant; they are depending on how prepared you are to handle the situation, so are your staff. The cost of recovering from a data breach for a small organisation is between £35 – 65K (and that’s not including fines). Can your organisation afford that? Probably not, but you could have afforded the costs which would have prevented this breach in the first place.

Let’s say that the breach happened because a new member of staff was unaware that they shouldn’t open emails in the spam folder. An email was opened, malicious software was installed and login credentials were stolen. You could have trained that member of staff on basic information security in under an hour, for £45. But instead, you chose to ignore your IT Manager who’s been raising spam issues at each monthly meeting but all you chose to hear is “we’ve not been hacked” and “invest” which is enough for you to move on.

What your IT Manager is really telling you is “We’ve recently been receiving a large amount of emails into our spam filter, and some are getting through. I think we need to invest in a more advanced spam filter, and perhaps train some of the staff on which emails to avoid. A virus from an email could lead to a hack, it’s not happened yet but there’s a chance it will.”

Forget blaming the IT Manager or the new member of staff when that breach happens, it comes down to you and your:

Inability to perceive cyber threats

Grey areas in appropriate knowledge

Naivety

Overhead cost restrictions

Refusal to listen to something you don’t understand

Absent mindedness

No interest in the customer’s best interests

Careless decisions

Eventual disaster

 

Cyber security threats are real, so why are you ignoring them?

To save money? Tell that to a judge

Introduction to Hacking & Crimeware

You don’t understand the threats? Read this book

 




Tags: Computer security, data breach, Email spam, hackers, Information Security, Malware


Jun 29 2011

The weakest link in computer hacking?

Category: Security AwarenessDISC @ 10:30 am

Hack

Image by copyfighting via Flickr

The weakest link in computer hacking? Human error
By Cliff Edwards, Olga Kharif,Michael Riley, Bloomberg News

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security ran a test this year to see how hard it was for hackers to corrupt workers and gain access to computer systems. Not very, it turned out.

Staff secretly dropped computer discs and USB thumb drives in the parking lots of government buildings and private contractors. Of those who picked them up, 60 percent plugged the devices into office computers, curious to see what they contained. If the drive or CD case had an official logo, 90 percent were installed.

“There’s no device known to mankind that will prevent people from being idiots,” said Mark Rasch, director of network security and privacy consulting for Falls Church, Va.’s Computer Sciences Corp.

The test showed something computer security experts have long known: Humans are the weak link in the fight to secure networks against sophisticated hackers. The intruders’ ability to exploit people’s vulnerabilities has tilted the odds in their favor and led to a spurt in cybercrimes.

In real-life intrusions, executives of EMC Corp.’s RSA Security, Intel Corp. and Google Inc. were targeted with e-mails with traps set in the links. And employees unknowingly post vital information on Facebook or Twitter.

It’s part of a $1 trillion problem, based on the estimated cost of all forms of online theft, according to McAfee Inc., the Santa Clara computer security company.

Hundreds of incidents likely go unreported, said Rasch, who previously headed the Justice Department’s computer crime unit. Corporate firewalls costing millions to erect often succeed in blocking viruses and other forms of malware that infect computers and steal data such as credit card information and passwords. Human error can quickly negate those defenses.

“Rule No. 1 is, don’t open suspicious links,” Rasch said. “Rule No. 2 is, see Rule No. 1. Rule No. 3 is, see Rules 1 and 2.”

A full report on the Homeland Security study will be published this year, Sean McGurk, director of the department’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center, said at a June 16 conference in Washington.

Tactics such as spear-phishing – sending a limited number of rigged e-mails to a select group of recipients – rely on human weaknesses like trust, laziness or even hubris.

That’s what happened in March, when attackers used a clever ruse to exploit their discovery that RSA – the company that provides network-access tokens using random secondary passwords – was in a hiring campaign.

Two small groups of employees received e-mails with attached Excel spreadsheets titled “2011 Recruitment Plan,” the company said in April. The e-mails were caught by the junk-mail screen. Even so, one employee went into the folder, retrieved the file and opened it.

The spreadsheet contained an embedded Adobe Systems Inc. Flash file that exploited a bug, then unknown to San Jose’s Adobe, that allowed hackers to commandeer the employee’s PC. RSA said information related to its two-factor SecurID authentication process was taken.

Banks may be forced to pay $50 million to $100 million to distribute new RSA SecurID devices, according to Avivah Litan, a Gartner Inc. research analyst.

“The team that hacked us is very organized and had a lot of practice,” Uri Rivner, head of new technologies at RSA Security, said at a June 17 conference in Spain. “I can compare them to the Navy Seals Team Six, which hit Osama bin Laden.”

The FBI began warning in early 2009 about a rise in spear-phishing attacks. To succeed, they require the target to open a link presumably sent by someone they know or trust.

Total phishing attacks increased by 6.7 percent from June 2010 to May 2011, according to Symantec Corp.’s State of Spam & Phishing monthly report. The number of non-English phishing sites increased 18 percent month over month.

Spear-phishing is evolving into what Rasch calls whale phishing: Targeting senior-level executives whose computers may have access to far more sensitive information that rank-and-file workers.

Technology executives are attractive targets because their positions give them access to a trove of information, and they tend to believe they’re better protected from computer hackers than their employees, Rasch said.

Hackers research decision makers by browsing social networks, reading up on news about the company, and creating e-mails and links that appear to be genuine and come from people that the targets know.

“Phishing is on a different trajectory than it’s been in the past,” said Malcolm Harkins, Intel’s chief information-security officer.

This article appeared on page D – 2 of the San Francisco Chronicle on June 28, 2011

Hacking: The Art of Exploitation




Tags: hackers, International Monetary Fund, McAfee, phishing, RSA SecurID, RSA Security, RSA The Security Division of EMC, SecurID


Oct 13 2008

World Bank security breach and financial crisis

Category: Information Warfare,Security BreachDISC @ 1:56 am

The World Bank controls the World’s banking system, creates plans and strategies to develop economies to protect countries from financial turmoil. This information is a treasure trove of data which can be manipulated for huge monetary or political gain.

Amongst the financial crisis, a major security breach has been reported at World Bank that might tell us a story that protecting consumers’ data during these crisis might not be the first priority for many suffering financial institutions.

World Bank Under Siege in “Unprecedented Crisis

“It is still not known how much information was stolen. But sources inside the bank confirm that servers in the institution’s highly-restricted treasury unit were deeply penetrated with spy software last April. Invaders also had full access to the rest of the bank’s network for nearly a month in June and July.”
“In total, at least six major intrusions — two of them using the same group of IP addresses originating from China have been detected at the World Bank since the summer of 2007, with the most recent breach occurring just last month. ”

The World Bank’s technology and security expert states that the incident is an “unprecedented crisis.” Some security experts are saying that this might be the worst security breach to date at a global financial institution. The hackers controlled around 18 servers for more than a month and World Bank admits that sensitive data could have been stolen but they are not sure about the total impact of the breach.

Alan Calder wrote about “Data protection and financial chaos” and mentioned that “When financial markets appear to be in free fall, many organizations might think that data protection is the least of their worries. Who cares, they might wonder, about protecting personal data if tomorrow we might not exist anymore?”
I concur with Alan on this point, in the midst of this chaos, our personal data might be at great risk and we have to be vigilant and carry the load to protect our data. At the same time, this might become another reason for the financial institutions’ demise if they let their guards down now and do not make a priority to protect customers’ data.

During this turmoil, some financial institutions’ upper management doesn’t have to worry about their responsibility of securing the customers data adequately when they already know that eventually the taxpayers will be paying for their mistakes and their bonus plan will stay intact. Unprecedented crisis are sometimes the result of unprecedented greed.

Glassner “I don’t know that the captain of the Titanic got a bonus for driving the boat into iceberg. They at least had the decency to go down with the ship” [quoted in ‘Wachovia’s Golden Parachutes” story in S.F. Chronicle of 10/10/08 pg. C1].

Bill Gates “I’m quite worried about the fiscal imbalances that we’ve got and what that might mean in terms of financial crisis ahead.”

Chinese hackers: No site is safe
httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovNVhk1rVVE&feature=related


(Free Two-Day Shipping from Amazon Prime). Great books




Tags: china, consumers data, data protection, deeply penetrated, financial chaos, financial crisis, full access, hackers, inicident, monetary gain, restricted treasury, Security Breach, sensitive data, spy software, treasure trove, unprecedented crises, unprecedented greed