By design, Brave Today doesn’t let the company or third parties build user profiles.

Brave Software, maker of the Brave Web browser, is introducing a news reader that’s designed to protect user privacy by preventing parties—both internal and third party—from tracking the sites, articles, and story topics people view.

Brave Today, as the service is called, is using technology that the company says sets it apart from news services offered by Google and Facebook. It’s designed to deliver personalized news feeds in a way that leaves no trail for Brave, ISPs, and third parties to track. The new service is part of Brave’s strategy of differentiating its browser as more privacy-friendly than its competitors’.

Key to Brave Today is a new content delivery network the company is unveiling. Typically, news services use a single CDN to cache content and then serve it to users. This allows the CDN or the service using it to see both the IP address and news feed of each user, and over time, that data can help services build detailed profiles of a person’s interests.

The Brave Today CDN takes a different approach. It’s designed in a way that separates a user’s IP address from the content they request. One entity offers a load-balancing service that receives TLS-encrypted traffic from the user. The load balancer then passes the traffic on to the CDN that processes the request.

The load balancer knows the user’s IP address, but because the request is encrypted, it has no visibility into the content the user is seeking. The CDN, meanwhile, sees only the request but has no way of knowing the IP address that’s making it. Responses are delivered in reverse order. To prevent the data from being combined, Brave says that it will use one provider for load balancing and a different one for content delivery.

Source: Brave browser-maker launches privacy-friendly news reader



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