Information security

Information security (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

July 22nd, 2013 by Lewis Morgan 

I overheard a conversation the other day, one which left me so stunned that I’ve decided to write about it….

Two men having dinner behind me (I got the impression they were both directors) were discussing the £200k fine the NHS received for losing patient data. Eventually, the conversation turned into a discussion about information security as a whole. I won’t go into all the details but one of them said, “We don’t particularly focus on cyber security, it’s always large organisations which are in the news about getting hacked and being a small company, we’re not under threat”. It bothered me (probably more than it should have) that someone in control of an organisation has that attitude to cyber security. If an organisation of 5 employees was hacked, the same day as, let’s say DELL, were hacked – who’d make it into the news? DELL would, why? Because it’s likely to be more of an interest to the readers/listeners and will have a bigger impact on the public compared to that of the smaller organisation.

I never see stories in the news of someone being hit by a bus in my local town, but it doesn’t mean I’ll walk in front of one holding a sign saying ‘hit me’. That’s effectively what this director is doing, turning a blind eye to a large threat just because he’s not seen an example of a small organisation being hacked – chances are he doesn’t even read the publications which cover those stories.

Ignorance

It’s a strong word, isn’t it? Personally I hate calling people ignorant, I’d rather use a more constructive word such as ‘unaware’, but I feel that using the word ignorance will raise some eyebrows.

As a director of a company, your aim is to maximise revenue, minimise costs and anything in between.

You need a future for your organisation; this is usually done by investing in your marketing efforts, improving your products/services and providing the best customer service possible. But what do you do to actually secure a future? It’s all good and well having a 5 year plan which see’s 400% growth in revenue, but how do you make sure that your organisation will even exist in 5 years?

2 years into your plan and you’re hitting your targets – but you’ve just discovered that there’s been a data breach and your customers credit card details have been sold online.

Your plans have now become redundant; they are depending on how prepared you are to handle the situation, so are your staff. The cost of recovering from a data breach for a small organisation is between £35 – 65K (and that’s not including fines). Can your organisation afford that? Probably not, but you could have afforded the costs which would have prevented this breach in the first place.

Let’s say that the breach happened because a new member of staff was unaware that they shouldn’t open emails in the spam folder. An email was opened, malicious software was installed and login credentials were stolen. You could have trained that member of staff on basic information security in under an hour, for £45. But instead, you chose to ignore your IT Manager who’s been raising spam issues at each monthly meeting but all you chose to hear is “we’ve not been hacked” and “invest” which is enough for you to move on.

What your IT Manager is really telling you is “We’ve recently been receiving a large amount of emails into our spam filter, and some are getting through. I think we need to invest in a more advanced spam filter, and perhaps train some of the staff on which emails to avoid. A virus from an email could lead to a hack, it’s not happened yet but there’s a chance it will.”

Forget blaming the IT Manager or the new member of staff when that breach happens, it comes down to you and your:

Inability to perceive cyber threats

Grey areas in appropriate knowledge

Naivety

Overhead cost restrictions

Refusal to listen to something you don’t understand

Absent mindedness

No interest in the customer’s best interests

Careless decisions

Eventual disaster

 

Cyber security threats are real, so why are you ignoring them?

To save money? Tell that to a judge

Introduction to Hacking & Crimeware

You don’t understand the threats? Read this book