gdpr

The GDPR will replace these with a pan-European regulatory framework effective from 25 May 2018.  The GDPR applies to all EU organizations – whether commercial business or public authority – that collect, store or process the personal data (PII) of EU individuals.

Organizations based outside the EU that monitor or offer goods and services to individuals in the EU will have to observe the new European rules and adhere to the same level of protection of personal data. This potentially includes organizations everywhere in the world, regardless of how difficult it may be to enforce the Regulation. Compliance consultant must know the following 9 tenants of the GDPR.

 

  • Supervisory Authority – A one-stop shop provision means that organizations will only have to deal with a single supervisory authority, not one for each of the EU’s 28 member states, making it simpler and cheaper for companies to do business in the EU.

 

  • Breach Disclosure – Organizations must disclose and document the causes of breaches, effects of breaches, and actions taken to address them.

 

  • Processor must be able to provide “sufficient guarantees to implement appropriate technical and organizational measures” to ensure that processing will comply with the GDPR and that data subjects’ rights are protected. This requirement flows down the supply chain, so a processor cannot subcontract work to a second processor without the controller’s explicit authorization. If requested by subject you must cease processing and using his or her data for some limited period of time.

 

  • Data Consent – The Regulation imposes stricter requirements on obtaining valid consent from individuals to justify the processing of their personal data. Consent must be “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the individual’s wishes”. The organization must also keep records so it can demonstrate that consent has been given by the relevant individual. Data can only be used for the purposes that data subject originally explicitly consented. You must obtain and document consent for only one specific purpose at a time.

 

  • Right to be forgotten – Individuals have a right to require the data controller to erase all personal data held about them in certain circumstances, such as where the data is no longer necessary for the purposes for which it was collected. If requested by subject, you must erase their data on premises, in apps and on devices.

 

  • Data portability – Individuals will have the right to transfer personal data from one data controller to another where processing is based on consent or necessity for the performance of a contract, or where processing is carried out by automated means

 

  • Documentation – The Regulation requires quite a bit of documentation. In addition to the explicit and implicit requirements for specific records (especially including proof of consent from data subjects), you should also ensure that you have documented how you comply with the GDPR so that you have some evidence to support your claims if the supervisory authority has any cause to investigate.

 

  • Fines – Major noncompliance of the law will be punishable by fines of up to either 4% or €20 million of group annual worldwide turnover.

 

Data protection by design – Organization must ensure data security and data privacy across cloud and endpoints as well as design their system and processes that protects from unauthorized data access and malware.  Specifically, organizations must take appropriate technical and organizational measures before data processing begin to ensure that it meets the requirements of the Regulation. Data privacy risks must be properly assessed, and controllers may use adherence to approved codes of conduct or management system certifications, such as ISO 27001, to demonstrate their compliance.

 

How to improve information security under the GDPR

Although many businesses understand the importance of implementing the right procedures for detection, report and investigate a data breach, but not many are aware of how to go about this effectively, especially during implementation phase.

 

Seven steps that can help you prevent a data breach:

  1. Find out where your personal information resides and prioritize your data.
  2. Identify all the risks that could cause a breach of your personal data.
  3. Apply the most appropriate measures (controls) to mitigate those risks.
  4. Implement the necessary policies and procedures to support the controls.
  5. Conduct regular tests and audits to make sure the controls are working as intended.
  6. Review, report and update your plans regularly.
  7. Implement comprehensive and robust ISMS.

 

ISO 27001, the international information security standard, can help you achieve all of the above and protect all your other confidential company information, too. To achieve GDPR compliance, feel free to contact us for more detail on implementation.

Related articles on GDPR and ISO 27k

The GDPR and Personal Data…HELP! from Cloud Security Alliance