Privacy notice under the GDPR

 


A privacy notice is a public statement of how your organisation applies data protection principles to processing data. It should be a clear and concise document that is accessible by individuals.

Articles 12, 13 and 14 of the GDPR outline the requirements on giving privacy information to data subjects. These are more detailed and specific than in the UK Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA).

The GDPR says that the information you provide must be:

  • Concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible;
  • Written in clear and plain language, particularly if addressed to a child; and
  • Free of charge.

Help with creating a privacy notice template

The privacy notice should address the following to sufficiently inform the data subject:

  • Who is collecting the data?
  • What data is being collected?
  • What is the legal basis for processing the data?
  • Will the data be shared with any third parties?
  • How will the information be used?
  • How long will the data be stored for?
  • What rights does the data subject have?
  • How can the data subject raise a complaint?

Below is an example of a customisable privacy notice template, available from IT Governance here.

GDPR Privacy Notice Template - Example from the EU GDPR Documentation Toolkit

Example of the privacy notice template available to purchase from IT Governance

If you are looking for a complete set of GDPR templates to help with your compliance project, you may be interested in the market-leading EU GDPR Documentation Toolkit. This toolkit is designed and developed by expert GDPR practitioners, and has been used by thousands of organisations worldwide. It includes:

  • A complete set of easy-to-use and customisable documentation templates, which will save you time and money and ensure GDPR compliance;
  • Helpful dashboards and project tools to ensure complete GDPR coverage;
  • Direction and guidance from expert GDPR practitioners; and
  • Two licences for the GDPR Staff Awareness E-learning Course.


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Six Essential Data Protection and Privacy Requirements Under GDPR

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By Leighton Johnson, CISA, CISM, CIFI, CISSP

With the advent of the European Union (EU) deadline for General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) (EU 2016/679 regulation) coming up on 25 May 2018, many organizations are addressing their data gathering, protection and retention needs concerning the privacy of their data for EU citizens and residents. This regulation has many parts, as ISACA has described in many of its recent publications and events, but all of the efforts revolve around the protection and retention of the EU participants’ personal information. The 6 main areas for data protection defined in this regulation are:

  1. Data security controls need to be, by default, active at all times. Allowing security controls to be optional is not recommended or even suggested. “Always on” is the mantra for protection.
  2. These controls and the protection they provide must be embedded inside all applications. The GDPR view is that privacy is an essential part of functionality, the security of the system and its processing activities.
  3. Along with embedding the data protection controls in applications, the system must maintain data privacy across the entire processing effort for the affected data. This end-to-end need for protection includes collection efforts, retention requirements and even the new “right to be forgotten” requirement, wherein the customer has the right to request removal of their data from an organization’s storage.
  4. Complete data protection and privacy adds full-functional security and business requirements to any processing system in this framework for data privacy. It provides that business requirements and data protection requirements be equally important during the business process.
  5. The primary requirement for protection within the GDPR framework demands the security and privacy controls implemented are proactive rather than reactive. As its principal goal, the system needs to prevent issues, releases and successful attacks. The system is to keep privacy events from occurring in the first place.
  6. With all of these areas needed under GDPR, the most important point for organizations to understand about GDPR is transparency. The EU wants full disclosure of an organization’s efforts, documentation, reviews, assessments and results available for independent third-party review at any point. The goal is to ensure privacy managed by these companies is not dependent upon technology or business practices. It needs to be provable to outside parties and, therefore, acceptable. The EU has purposely placed some strong fine structures and responses into this regulation to ensure compliance.

Having reviewed various organizational efforts in preparation for GDPR implementation, it has been found that it is good practice to look at these 6 areas for all the collected and retained data, not just EU-based data. This zero-tolerance approach to data breaches is purposely designed to be stringent and strong. Good luck to all in meeting and maintaining the data privacy and security requirements of GDPR.

Steps to EU GDPR compliance

 


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How ISO 27001 can help to achieve GDPR compliance

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By Julia Dutton

Organizations have until 25 May 2018 to comply with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Those who have studied the Regulation will be aware that there are many references to certification schemes, seals and marks. The GDPR encourages the use of certification schemes like ISO 27001 to serve the purpose of demonstrating that the organisation is actively managing its data security in line with international best practice.

Managing people, processes and technology

ISO 27001 is the international best practice standard for information security, and is a certifiable standard that is broad-based and encompasses the three essential aspects of a comprehensive information security regime: people, processes and technology.  By implementing measures to protect information using this three-pronged approach, the company is able to defend itself from not only technology-based risks, but other, more common threats, such as poorly informed staff or ineffective procedures.

By implementing ISO 27001, your organisation will be deploying an ISMS (information security management system): a system that is supported by top leadership, incorporated into your organisation’s culture and strategy, and which is constantly monitored, updated and reviewed.  Using a process of continual improvement, your organisation will be able to ensure that the ISMS adapts to changes – both in the environment and inside the organisation – to continually identify and reduce risks.

What does the GDPR say?

The GDPR states clearly in Article 32 that “the controller and the processor shall implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure a level of security appropriate to the risk, including inter alia as appropriate:

  1. the pseudonymisation and encryption of personal data;
  2. the ability to ensure the ongoing confidentiality, integrity, availability and resilience of processing systems and services;
  3. the ability to restore the availability and access to personal data in a timely manner in the event of a physical or technical incident;
  4. a process for regularly testing, assessing and evaluating the effectiveness of technical and organisational measures for ensuring the security of the processing.”

Let’s look at these items separately:

Encryption of data is recommended by ISO 27001 as one of the measures that can and should be taken to reduce the identified risks.  ISO 27001:2013 outlines 114 controls that can be used to reduce information security risks.  Since the controls an organisation implements are based on the outcomes of an ISO 27001-compliant risk assessment, the organisation will be able to identify which assets are at risk and require encryption to adequately protect them.

One of ISO 27001’s core tenets is the importance of ensuring the ongoing confidentiality, integrity and availability of information.  Not only is confidentiality important, but the integrity and availability of such data is critical as well. If the data is available but in a format that is not usable because of a system disruption, then the integrity of that data has been compromised; if the data is protected but inaccessible to those who need to use it as part of their jobs, then the availability of that data has been compromised.

Risk assessment

ISO 27001 mandates that organisations conduct a thorough risk assessment by identifying threats and vulnerabilities that can affect an organisation’s information assets, and to take steps to assure the confidentiality, availability and integrity (CIA) of that data. The GDPR specifically requires a risk assessment to ensure an organisation has identified risks that can impact personal data.

Business continuity

ISO 27001 addresses the importance of business continuity management, whereby it provides a set of controls that will assist the organisation to protect the availability of information in case of an incident and protect critical business processes from the effects of major disasters to ensure their timely resumption.

Testing and assessments

Lastly, organisations that opt for certification to ISO 27001 will have their ISMSs independently assessed and audited by an accredited certification body to ensure that the management system meets the requirements of the Standard. Companies need to regularly review their ISMS and conduct the necessary assessments as prescribed by the Standard in order to ensure it continues protecting the company’s information. Achieving accredited certification to ISO 27001 delivers an independent, expert assessment of whether you have implemented adequate measures to protect your data.

The requirements to achieve compliance with ISO 27001 of course do not stop there.  Being a broad standard, it covers many other elements, including the importance of staff awareness training and leadership support.  ISO 27001 has already been adopted by thousands of organisations globally, and, given the current rate and severity of data breaches, it is also one of the fastest growing management system standards today.

Related articles:

Read more about ISO 27001 and the GDPR >>>>
GDPR Documentation Toolkit and gap assessment tool >>>>
Understanding the GDPR: General Data Protection Regulation >>>>

 


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GDPR essentials and how to achieve compliance

gdpr

The GDPR will replace these with a pan-European regulatory framework effective from 25 May 2018.  The GDPR applies to all EU organizations – whether commercial business or public authority – that collect, store or process the personal data (PII) of EU individuals.

Organizations based outside the EU that monitor or offer goods and services to individuals in the EU will have to observe the new European rules and adhere to the same level of protection of personal data. This potentially includes organizations everywhere in the world, regardless of how difficult it may be to enforce the Regulation. Compliance consultant must know the following 9 tenants of the GDPR.

 

  • Supervisory Authority – A one-stop shop provision means that organizations will only have to deal with a single supervisory authority, not one for each of the EU’s 28 member states, making it simpler and cheaper for companies to do business in the EU.

 

  • Breach Disclosure – Organizations must disclose and document the causes of breaches, effects of breaches, and actions taken to address them.

 

  • Processor must be able to provide “sufficient guarantees to implement appropriate technical and organizational measures” to ensure that processing will comply with the GDPR and that data subjects’ rights are protected. This requirement flows down the supply chain, so a processor cannot subcontract work to a second processor without the controller’s explicit authorization. If requested by subject you must cease processing and using his or her data for some limited period of time.

 

  • Data Consent – The Regulation imposes stricter requirements on obtaining valid consent from individuals to justify the processing of their personal data. Consent must be “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the individual’s wishes”. The organization must also keep records so it can demonstrate that consent has been given by the relevant individual. Data can only be used for the purposes that data subject originally explicitly consented. You must obtain and document consent for only one specific purpose at a time.

 

  • Right to be forgotten – Individuals have a right to require the data controller to erase all personal data held about them in certain circumstances, such as where the data is no longer necessary for the purposes for which it was collected. If requested by subject, you must erase their data on premises, in apps and on devices.

 

  • Data portability – Individuals will have the right to transfer personal data from one data controller to another where processing is based on consent or necessity for the performance of a contract, or where processing is carried out by automated means

 

  • Documentation – The Regulation requires quite a bit of documentation. In addition to the explicit and implicit requirements for specific records (especially including proof of consent from data subjects), you should also ensure that you have documented how you comply with the GDPR so that you have some evidence to support your claims if the supervisory authority has any cause to investigate.

 

  • Fines – Major noncompliance of the law will be punishable by fines of up to either 4% or €20 million of group annual worldwide turnover.

 

Data protection by design – Organization must ensure data security and data privacy across cloud and endpoints as well as design their system and processes that protects from unauthorized data access and malware.  Specifically, organizations must take appropriate technical and organizational measures before data processing begin to ensure that it meets the requirements of the Regulation. Data privacy risks must be properly assessed, and controllers may use adherence to approved codes of conduct or management system certifications, such as ISO 27001, to demonstrate their compliance.

 

How to improve information security under the GDPR

Although many businesses understand the importance of implementing the right procedures for detection, report and investigate a data breach, but not many are aware of how to go about this effectively, especially during implementation phase.

 

Seven steps that can help you prevent a data breach:

  1. Find out where your personal information resides and prioritize your data.
  2. Identify all the risks that could cause a breach of your personal data.
  3. Apply the most appropriate measures (controls) to mitigate those risks.
  4. Implement the necessary policies and procedures to support the controls.
  5. Conduct regular tests and audits to make sure the controls are working as intended.
  6. Review, report and update your plans regularly.
  7. Implement comprehensive and robust ISMS.

 

ISO 27001, the international information security standard, can help you achieve all of the above and protect all your other confidential company information, too. To achieve GDPR compliance, feel free to contact us for more detail on implementation.

Related articles on GDPR and ISO 27k

The GDPR and Personal Data…HELP! from Cloud Security Alliance

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Data flow mapping under the EU GDPR

As part of an EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) compliance project, organisations will need to map their data and information flows in order to assess their privacy risks. This is also an essential first step for completing a data protection impact assessment (DPIA), which is mandatory for certain types of processing.

The key elements of data mapping

To effectively map your data, you need to understand the information flow, describe it and identify its key elements.

1. Understand the information flow

An information flow is a transfer of information from one location to another, for example:

  • From inside to outside the European Union; or
  • From suppliers and sub-suppliers through to customers.

2. Describe the information flow

  • Walk through the information lifecycle to identify unforeseen or unintended uses of data. This also helps to minimise what data is collected.
  • Make sure the people who will be using the information are consulted on the practical implications.
  • Consider the potential future uses of the information collected, even if it is not immediately necessary.

3. Identify its key elements

Data items

  • What kind of data is being processed (name, email, address, etc.) and what category does it fall into (health data, criminal records, location data, etc.)?

Formats

  • In what format do you store data (hardcopy, digital, database, bring your own device, mobile phones, etc.)?

Transfer method

  • How do you collect data (post, telephone, social media) and how do you share it internally (within your organisation) and externally (with third parties)?

Location

  • What locations are involved within the data flow (offices, the Cloud, third parties, etc.)?

Accountability

  • Who is accountable for the personal data? Often this changes as the data moves throughout the organisation.

Access

  • Who has access to the data in question?

 

The key challenges of data mapping

  • Identifying personal data Personal data can reside in a number of locations and be stored in a number of formats, such as paper, electronic and audio. Your first challenge is deciding what information you need to record and in what format.
  • Identifying appropriate technical and organizational safeguards The second challenge is likely to be identifying the appropriate technology – and the policy and procedures for its use – to protect information while also determining who controls access to it.
  • Understanding legal and regulatory obligations Your final challenge is determining what your organisation’s legal and regulatory obligations are. As well as the GDPR, this can include other compliance standards, such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and ISO 27001.Once you’ve completed these three challenges, you’ll be in a position to move forward, gaining the trust and confidence of your key stakeholders.

 

Data flow mapping

To help you gather the above information and consolidate it into one area, Vigilant Software, a subsidiary of IT Governance, has developed a data flow mapping tool with a specific focus on the GDPR.

 

Order Today

 


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GDPR Documentation Toolkit and gap assessment tool

Data Protection / EU GDPR Toolkits

 

Use this gap assessment tool to:

  • Quickly identify your GDPR compliance gaps
  • Plan and prioritize your GDPR project

EU GDPR Compliance Gap Assessment Tool

 

Accelerate your GDPR compliance implementation project with the market-leading EU GDPR Documentation Toolkit used by hundreds of organizations worldwide, now with significant improvements and new content for summer 2017:

  • A complete set of easy-to-use and customizable documentation templates, which will save you time and money, and ensure compliance with the GDPR.
  • Easy-to-use dashboards and project tools to ensure complete coverage of the GDPR.
  • Direction and guidance from expert GDPR practitioners.
  • Includes two licenses for the GDPR Staff Awareness E-learning Course.

EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Documentation Toolkit


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EU GDPR: Does my organization need to comply?

By Chloe Biscoe

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a new law that will harmonize data protection in the European Union (EU) and will be enforced from May 25, 2018. It aims to protect EU residents from data and privacy breaches, and has been introduced to keep up with the modern digital landscape.

Who needs to comply with the GDPR?

The GDPR will apply to all organizations outside of the EU that process the personal data of EU residents.

Non-compliance can result in hefty fines of up to 4% of annual global turnover or €20 million $23.5 million) – whichever is greater.

Organizations that are compliant with the new Regulation will also find that their processes and contractual relationships are more robust and reliable.

What do US organizations need to do to comply with the GDPR?

The transition period for compliance with the GDPR ends in May 2018. This means that organizations now have less than ten months to make sure they are compliant.

For US organizations, the most significant change concerns the territorial reach of the GDPR.

The GDPR will supersede the current EU Data Protection Directive. Under the current Regulation, organizations without a physical presence or employees in the EU have one main compliance issue to deal with: How to legally transfer data out of the EU. The EU–US Privacy Shield provides such a mechanism for compliance.

Almost all US organizations that collect or process EU residents’ data will need to comply fully with the requirements of the GDPR. US organizations without a physical EU presence must also appoint a GDPR representative based in a Member State.

Save 10% on your essential guide to the GDPR and the EU–US Privacy Shield

EU GDPR & EU-US Privacy Shield – A Pocket GuideAugust’s book of the month is the ideal resource for anyone wanting a clear primer on the principles of data protection and their new obligations under the GDPR and the EU–US Privacy Shield.

Alan Calder’s EU GDPR & EU-US Privacy Shield – A Pocket Guide explains in simple terms:

  • The terms and definitions used within the GDPR and the EU-US Privacy Shield
  • The key requirements
  • How to comply with the Regulation

 

Data Protection / EU GDPR Toolkits

 

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Why your organisation should consider outsourcing its DPO

Why your organisation should consider outsourcing its DPO

By Laura Downes

Since the EU’s GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) came into effect in May 2018, demand for DPOs (data protection officers) has increased. The Regulation stipulates that certain organisations must appoint a DPO to support their GDPR compliance. DPOs also have an essential role as intermediaries between relevant stakeholders, such as supervisory authorities, data subjects, and business units within an organisation. 

Your organisation will need to appoint a DPO if it:  

  • Is a public authority or body; 
  • Regularly and systematically monitors data subjects; or 
  • Processes special categories of data on a large scale. 

The GDPR does not stipulate the level of experience a DPO must have, meaning some organisations might appoint an internal team member who does not have the experience or qualifications required, leaving them wide open to error.  

Why you should consider outsourcing your DPO 

Suitably skilled and experienced DPO candidates are hard to find. Outsourcing the role not only satisfies the requirements of the GDPR but also ensures your organisation is employing proper data handling and privacy policies. Furthermore, there is no conflict of interest between the DPO and other business activities. 

An external DPO can work for your organisation on a fixed-fee or a per-hour basis. Signing up to a DPO service also means you can rely on several experienced DPOs rather than just one, which means more hands on deck should you ever suffer a breach. 

DPO as a service (GDPR) 

IT Governance’s annual subscription DPO service offers you hands-on support from one of our qualified DPOs, who will serve as independent data protection expert to your organisation. Your appointed DPO will: 

Find out more >> 


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Equifax fined by ICO over data breach that hit Britons

Equifax

Credit rating agency Equifax is to be fined £500,000 by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) after it failed to protect the personal data of 15 million Britons.

A 2017 cyber-attack exposed information belonging to 146 million people around the world, mostly in the US.

The compromised systems were also US-based.

But the ICO ruled Equifax’s UK branch had “failed to take appropriate steps” to protect UK citizens’ data.

It added that “multiple failures” meant personal information had been kept longer than necessary and left vulnerable.

Originally, Equifax reported that fewer than 400,000 Britons had had sensitive data exposed in the breach – but it later revealed that the number was nearly 700,000.

A further 14.5 million British records exposed would not have put people at risk, the company added last October.

The ICO, which joined forces with the Financial Conduct Authority to investigate the breach, found that it affected three distinct groups in the following ways:

  • 19,993 UK data subjects had names, dates of birth, telephone numbers and driving licence numbers exposed
  • 637,430 UK data subjects had names, dates of birth and telephone numbers exposed
  • Up to 15 million UK data subjects had names and dates of birth exposed

 

Guard let down

Equifax had also been warned about a critical vulnerability in its systems by the US Department of Homeland Security in March 2017, the ICO revealed.

And appropriate steps to fix the vulnerability were not taken, according to the ICO.

Because the breach happened before the launch of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in May this year, the investigation took place under the UK’s Data Protection Act 1998 instead.

And the fine of £500,000 is the highest possible under that law.

“The loss of personal information, particularly where there is the potential for financial fraud, is not only upsetting to customers, it undermines consumer trust in digital commerce,” said information commissioner Elizabeth Denham.

“This is compounded when the company is a global firm whose business relies on personal data.”

An Equifax spokesperson said the firm was “disappointed in the findings and the penalty”.

“As the ICO makes clear in its report, Equifax has successfully implemented a broad range of measures to prevent the recurrence of such criminal incidents and it acknowledges the strengthened procedures which are now in effect.

“The criminal cyber-attack against our US parent company last year was a pivotal moment for our company. We apologise again to any consumers who were put at risk.”

By BBC.com


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4 bad things happening every minute on the Internet

4 bad things happening every minute on the Internet

Risk IQ’s Evil Internet Minute infographic tells you the bad things happening every minute on the Internet:

  • 5 successful ransomware attacks
  • 9 phishing attacks
  • 1,274 new malware variants
  • 5,518 records compromised

Any data you look at shows that the scale of ‘Internet evil’ increases every year. The economic impact of cyber crime now exceeds $1.1 million per minute. This is a major corporate risk, irrespective of organisational size, and cyber insurance is an inadequate response – insurers will not pay out where you have been negligent.

The EU’s GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) makes the tests for negligence pretty clear: absence of accountability, insufficient corporate governance and countermeasures that do not adequately respond to the frequency and virulence of today’s attacks.

In an environment where four potentially vulnerable web components are discovered every minute, an annual penetration test is only slightly better than not bothering at all. We run penetration tests about once a month; you should be doing them at least quarterly. However, even if you do this, you need to recognise that purely technical responses have limited benefits. Staff are the weakest of your links, particularly as phishing and ransomware attacks get smarter every day. And your supply chain may increasingly be your attackers’ fastest route into what passes for your secure environment. Staff awareness training only every year or two would be desperately short-sighted.

We’re going to see more and more organisations reporting data breaches – it’s now an offence to not report one, and you can be punished with significant fines. The costs don’t stop there. After you report a breach, and undergo investigation, fines and reputational damage, you still have to spend the money to get secure. It therefore probably works out less expensive in the long run to make comprehensive cyber security investments before you are breached (assuming that you haven’t already been breached, and you just don’t know it yet).


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What is ‘privacy by design’?

What is ‘privacy by design’?

Privacy by design is a voluntary approach to projects that promotes privacy and data protection compliance, and helps you comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA).

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) encourages organisations to seriously consider privacy and data protection throughout a project lifecycle, including when:

  • Building new IT systems to store or access personal data;
  • Needing to comply to regulatory or contractual requirements;
  • Developing internal policies or strategies with privacy implications;
  • Collaborating with an external party that involves data sharing; or
  • Existing data is used for new purposes.

Privacy by design and the GDPR

The upcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will supersede the DPA. Article 25 of the GDPR, “[d]ata protection by design and default”, requires you to “implement appropriate technical and organisational measures” throughout your data processing project. As such, data must be considered at the design stage of any project, during which you must process and store as little data as possible, for as short a time as possible.

Under the GDPR, you are required to document your data processing activities. One way to do this is to map your organisation’s data flows. This method also enables you to assess the risks in your data processing activities and identify where controls are required, for example, assessing privacy and data security risks.

Organisations need to be aware of the personal data that they are processing, and that this data is being processed in compliance with the law. Organisations can often process significantly more data than they realise, so it is vital that they perform mapping exercises to keep track of them all.

Data flow mapping may seem daunting, but you can simplify the process with the Data Flow Mapping Tool.

The tool gives you a thorough understanding of what personal data your organisation processes and why, where it is held and how it is transferred.

IT Governance free green paper ‘Conducting a data flow mapping exercise under the GDPR’ will help you understand how to effectively map your data in compliance with the GDPR.

Steps to GDPR Compliance


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4 reasons you should get a cyber security qualification

The dramatic rise in cyber attacks over the past few years has caught most businesses off guard. Their cyber security departments are severely understaffed, causing them to look desperately for qualified professionals to help tackle the threat.

There has never been a better time to get into cyber security, so if you’re looking to enter the field, or further your career in it, you could benefit massively from gaining a relevant qualification. Here are four reasons why:

  1. Cyber security professionals are well paid

Money isn’t everything when it comes to choosing your career, but it’s obviously a big factor for many people. We mentioned recently that people with a CISM®PCIor GDPR qualification could earn £60,000 or more a year.

Of these, the CISM (Certified Information Security Manager) qualification is the most versatile. It’s the globally accepted standard of achievement among information security, information systems audit and IT governance professionals.

According to ITJobsWatch, people with a CISM qualification earn £64,000 a year on average. This figure has grown by more than 9% in the past two years.

  1. There’s a high level of job security

The shortage of qualified cyber security professionals means that those in the field are less likely to be replaced or made redundant. Their skills are hard to find elsewhere, and the more someone gets to know the company, the more valuable they will become.

Additionally, because almost every organisation currently needs cyber security professionals, those with the relevant qualifications are more likely to find a position in a location or company that suits them.

  1. There’s room for career growth

For the same reason that cyber security is a safe career, it’s also one that offers plenty of room for growth. Qualifications plus experience is a powerful combination that can help you move into more senior positions.

As you gain experience, you’ll also get the opportunity to earn more advanced qualifications. For example, you must have at least three years’ experience in IT governance to be eligible for a Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) qualification, and five years’ experience to be eligible for a Certified in the Governance of Enterprise IT (CGEIT®) qualification.

  1. The work is rewarding

Cyber security is still a relatively young field, making it an exciting and prosperous place. The threats that organisations face are constantly evolving, so you’ll always have new challenges. Plus, you know that your hard work is for a good cause: to stop cyber criminals and keep your organisation safe.

What qualifications do I need?

The qualifications you need will depend on the career path you choose. If you’re interested in governance, risk management, and compliance, for instance, a CGEIT qualification is essential. If you’re interested in information security, you’ll need a CRISC qualification.

We’re currently running promotions on our CRISC, CGEIT, CISA and CISM training courses. If you book before 22 December, you’ll receive a 10% discount on the courses and a 5% discount on all reading materials.

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Fundamentals of Information Risk Management Auditing

New information and IT risks seem to be everywhere, so it is essential that organizations address these risks in the context of enterprise risk management (ERM).
ERM is a practice that has become increasingly popular. It’s important that an organization’s information risk management specialist or auditor understands this practice because much of their work will need to be in the context of ERM.
Kick-start your career in information risk management with introductory guidance.

Fundamentals of Information Risk Management Auditing

Provides insight and guidance into information risk management and ERM, ideal for those considering a career in information risk management, for non-specialist auditors, and for managers.
This book will give you an introduction to:
Risk and risk management
Information security and management risks
Concepts of application controls

Gain an insight into the risks and controls/mitigations that you might encounter when performing or managing an audit of information risk.
Buy Now >>>

 

Author Podcast: Fundamentals of Information Risk Management Auditing, with Christopher Wright

In the podcast Christopher discusses Lean, Agile, the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and ERM.
Listen now >>



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Why is ISO 27001 so important for US technology firms?

by Rob Freeman

At IT Governance, we have long known that compliance with the ISO 27001 information security management standard is essential for all US companies that wish to do business with the rest of the world. This requirement is fuelled by the ever growing threat of cybercrime and the increasing awareness of the data privacy rights of all individuals in target markets globally.

Win international business

To win and maintain international business, your firm needs to demonstrate that it takes cybersecurity and data privacy seriously, and fully complies with all of the relevant laws and regulations.

This is particularly true for US technology companies, many of which deliver services and products using online web-based channels. Modern Internet marketing and sales methodology demands the acquisition of large databases of customers’ personal data. In return for purchasing goods and services, these customers expect that their data will be secured, stored, and used in an appropriate manner. From the big guys like Microsoft or Salesforce.com to the little guys trading internationally on Ebay, ensuring the data security and privacy of customers is just as important as delivering a great product.

Although now a little dated, I can recommend that you view the August news release from InsideView, a CA-based market intelligence company, which announced “InsideView Expands ISO/IEC 27001:2013 Certification to Include ISO/IEC 27018”. This somewhat innocuous headline is hiding a really big message that is buried in the second paragraph:

A global priority

Protection of personal information has become a globally recognized priority. Emerging regulations and frameworks, such as European Union Data Protection Directive (GDPR) and the US Department of Commerce Privacy Shield, will require data processors to provide specific protections and rights of access regarding personal information.

“This extension of our ISO 27001 information security management system to include the ISO 27018 controls for personal data shows that InsideView is leading the market in preparation for new privacy regulations,” said Jenny Cheng, Chief Product Officer at InsideView.

If you are not aware of the importance of ISO 27001, I can recommend that you purchase and read this textbook: IT Governance – An International Guide to Data Security and ISO27001/ISO27002, Sixth Edition.

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